The Triple Digit Diet

The Super Elusive Triple Digit Weight Loss Diet

CHAPTER TWELVE

The Benefits of a Diet High in Protein

Since we’re on the topic of high protein diet studies, let’s talk more about it. Before diving into a high protein diet, you should know that a high protein diet isn’t for everyone. Consuming high amounts of protein may worsen kidney function in people with kidney disease because your body could have trouble eliminating all the waste products of protein metabolism. So just keep that in mind and be sure your kidneys are functioning properly before starting a high protein diet.

High protein benefits bone health. A Tufts University study, published in the April 2002 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggests a high protein diet plus adequate intakes of calcium and vitamin D may benefit bone health. Researchers compared the effects of calcium and vitamin D supplementation vs a placebo in 342 healthy men and women aged 65 and older.

Study participants either consumed a 500 milligram per day supplement of calcium in addition to the approximately 700 milligram per day of calcium derived from their diet, with approximately 200 IU per day of vitamin D or placebo for three years. Although the calcium intakes were below the recommended daily allowance (RDA), they were higher than the majority of people in this age group. However, protein intakes were generally above the RDA at between 79 and 96 grams per day.

A Tufts University study, published in the April 2002 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggests a high protein diet plus adequate intakes of calcium and vitamin D may benefit bone health.

According to lead researcher Bess Dawson-Hughes, M.D., "We found that protein has a favorable effect on changes in bone density if you have an adequate calcium and vitamin D intake. Some studies show protein is harmful to bone, others show it is not... [our results] may help to explain the variety of findings out there. It depends how much calcium and vitamin D the groups consume whether you'd see a positive effect. It raises the possibility that the elderly might benefit from more than the current RDA [of protein].”

While the Tufts University study was confined to elderly individuals, it is noteworthy because the findings could apply to the general adult population as well. As a result, it’s recommended that all those living a high protein lifestyle make sure that their calcium and vitamin D intakes are adequate.

Calcium supplementation is a convenient way high protein dieters can assure they’re consuming beneficial amounts of calcium and vitamin D. A daily recommended amount is 500 milligrams of calcium (hydroxyapatite form - highest absorption calcium), plus 400 IU of vitamin D in addition to a mineral complex including magnesium with Betaine HCL to aid mineral absorption.

Interesting note: From Nicholas Perricone, M.D. best-seller The Wrinkle Cure

"While you’re limiting the amounts of sugar and (lactose containing) dairy products in your diet, you may also need to increase the amount of protein you eat — especially if you’re female. Protein is absolutely essential for repairing damage done by free radicals. A lack of adequate protein in your diet prevents cellular repair and puts you on the fast track to aging. In my practice, I’ve consistently noticed that people who look older than their chronological age (yet are not suffering from any known disease) invariably have low protein intake.”

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Disclaimer - No Medical Advice: The information posted here should not be considered medical advice and is not intended to replace consultation with a qualified medical professional. If you have a medical condition, or are taking medication, do not begin this or any diet program without first consulting your health care professional.